Fm 350 1 Example Of Narrative Essay

Narrative Essay Topics

In a narrative essay, the writer tells a story about his/her personal experience. However, treating a narrative essay like an interesting bedtime story would be a mistake. It goes further. In this type of essay, the writer should speak about his/her experience within a specific context, such as a lesson learned. With a narrative essay, the writer not only entertains the reader but also teaches him, illustrating his point of view with a real-life example.


If you are assigned to write a narrative essay, here are some narrative writing prompts:

NARRATIVE ESSAY WRITING


How to Choose a Narrative Essay Topic?

Choosing an interesting topic and thinking over short story ideas is particularly important. When writing a narrative essay you should think about your life experience in the framework of the assignment’s theme, you would like to speak about. You should always remember that even a tiny event or incident could serve a plot for an interesting narrative story. The point is that it should convey a meaning; it should be a kind of instructive story.

There is a number of helpful techniques helping to invent an essay topic. If you don’t have a clue what experience to describe, you can brainstorm with your friends, surf the Internet or use this list of sample narrative essay topics.


Before getting started to choose a topic from the list provided by our writers, let’s read one of the narrative essay examples:

NARRATIVE ESSAY EXAMPLE


In case you already have the topic to write about but need help with your essay, you can contact our essay writing service in UK to order a custom-written narrative essay with www.essaymasters.co.uk! Our professional writers are available 24/7! 

Below is the great list of short story ideas:

TOP 70 Narrative Essay Topics

  1. If I could go back in time.
  2. If I could change anything in the history, what would I choose?
  3. The time I saw the weirdest thing in my life.
  4. My most frightening experience.
  5. One thing I’m afraid to lose.
  6. If I could change one thing about me.
  7. If I had a billion dollars.
  8. If I could stop the time.
  9. The most beautiful thing in the world for me.
  10. The most pleasant sound for me.
  11. My first day at a new school.
  12. The time I lost my friend.
  13. The time I got a new friend.
  14. My first day at a new job.
  15. My most disastrous day ever.
  16. My happiest day ever.
  17. The most irritating things in my life.
  18. An experience that left me disillusioned.
  19. How I met my fear.
  20. The moment I overcome my phobia.
  21. The achievement I’m proud of.
  22. My most dangerous experience.
  23. The journey that has changed me.
  24. The experience that taught me how appearance can be deceiving.
  25. My act of heroism.
  26. My act of cowardice.
  27. A thing I would like to change in my past.
  28. My first month of living on my own.
  29. The most successful day in my life.
  30. The time I was wrong about the person.
  31. My sudden act of a kindness.
  32. What my younger sibling taught me.
  33. A time when I felt that I’m experiencing a historic event.
  34. How I started relationships.
  35. The worst quarrel with my mother.
  36. An experience I thought I would never have.
  37. The biggest risk I’ve ever taken.
  38. Why do I like being alone?
  39. The hardest decision I’ve ever made.
  40. The hardest thing I’ve ever done.
  41. What challenges have I overcome?
  42. How do I relieve stress?
  43. What do I do when I feel depressed.
  44. 5 everyday problems that bother me.
  45. Who inspires me and why.
  46. Whom would I ask to come if I had my own Talk-show?
  47. People that have changed my life.
  48. Books or movies that have changed my world view.
  49. Devices playing the biggest role in my life.
  50. Side effects of my digital life.
  51. One day or week without an access to the Internet.
  52. What my profile in social networks tells about me.
  53. What music inspires me.
  54. What music can change my mood?
  55. What movies inspire me.
  56. What role television plays in my life.
  57. What television shows have mattered to me?
  58. What reality-show I would like to participate in.
  59. What memorable poetry have I learned?
  60. What books teach me.
  61. Why do I keep (or don’t keep) a diary or journal?
  62. What words or phrases I don’t like to use.
  63. The time I learned that grammar is necessary.
  64. The greatest conversation of my life.
  65. The teacher who inspired me.
  66. The role clubs and teams play in my life.
  67. My long-time passion.
  68. What superhero power I would like to have.
  69. Why I like (or don’t like) cooking.
  70. Waiting in line story.

More about a narrative essay:

NARRATIVE ESSAY OUTLINE


Have you already chosen a topic for your narrative essay? If not, feel free to contact our professional writers as they will offer a lot of topics to write about. Place an order for getting an instant quote for your narrative essay.

In a narrative essay, you want to tell the story by writing about an event or experience that you've had. It’s the ultimate in storytelling and requires some finesse to create a retelling that people will actually want to read.

Unlike other types of essays, a narrative essay allows you to express yourself. It's a story that you are telling, often from personal experience. You can look at a narrative essay example from middle school, high school or college, and you'll see the same elements throughout. That's because a story has very specific parts that must be included and the narrative is similar, no matter what the topic.

Using a narrative essay templatevia a writing tool can help you work through the essay quickly and ensure that it is correctly formatted. It may also help to check out a narrative essay example to see exactly how this type of writing is done.

Choose Your Story

The most essential part of writing a narrative essay is the selection of the story you want to tell. What can you share with readers that will impact them? What will you tell them that has meaning and isn't just an entertaining anecdote? A narrative essay needs to have a point, so you don't want to tell just any story, but rather one that will have a purpose.

Narrative essays tend to focus on a small story. You will not be writing your entire life into the essay, just a single event that you experienced. Take a look at some examples to see what a good narrative essay looks like and then you can begin to work on your own.

If you are struggling to find a story that will work, here are a few options to consider: A time when a major belief was shattered, or when someone influenced you or a time when you changed or attempted to change your life. There are endless stories to tell, so pick the one that will work best for the purpose of your narrative. Keep it narrow and focused. This is only about one single event, or you’ll end up writing an entire book.

Note that in a few cases, a narrative essay is not a story and will be written slightly differently. For example, a book report will be more informative than telling a story. In this case, it still talks about your opinion and feelings related to an event, but the event is within the book, not your own personal experience. However, most narrative essays will be personal.

Structure Your Narrative

Like all good stories, a narrative essay needs a beginning, middle, climax and end. It also needs characters and a plot, as well as a setting. All of these elements come together to ensure that the story flows properly and keeps people's interest.

While most narrative essays are written from the author's point of view, you can write from any perspective that works for the telling of the story. Above all, there needs to be a specific reason to tell the story. This is the most important thing to keep in mind as you plan and write. What is the purpose of telling this story? What will the reader learn? What will they walk away with after reading the essay?

You don’t have to have some big moral lesson in the essay to make it a narrative, but you should have a specific point. Think about what you want to accomplish with the essay and then focus on that as you write. Use this narrative essay outline to start your essay.

Start With a Bang

Your essay should grab the reader instantly. Starting with an impactful statement or a quote is a good way to begin. Give them a very good reason to continue reading. Use descriptive language to express yourself and tell your story in a way that captures the reader's attention.

The introduction is the most important part of your essay, since it is what will help the reader choose to read on or put the essay aside. Make sure it catches them and pulls them into the story, making them want to read on to find out what happens. The best narrative essays will turn a simple story into one that is captivating, using imaginative language.

Once you have the reader's attention, you can create an introduction that will present them with the setting and main characters of your story. Remember that every good story answers the questions who, what, when, where, how and why. While not all of this information needs to be in the intro, you should at least set the scene. Leave your reader curious enough to continue reading the essay.

Tell Your Story

The body of the essay should tell the rest of the story, usually in chronological order. Try to show the story, instead of just telling it. This means using descriptive language, including dialog and presenting the feelings that accompanied the event. Make your reader feel like they're in the story. For example, don’t say, “the dog walked up the street.” Instead, help the reader imagine the street and the dog. Was it well-kept? Or was the dog mangy and dirty? Was the street dirt, paved or cobbled? What kind of day was it?

The more details you include, the easier it is for the reader to picture themselves there. They will feel the story, rather than simply read it. “The old dog limped painfully down the center of the dirt street, the autumn wind kicking up leaves and dust around him.” This sentence makes it easier for you to imagine the dog and the street, doesn’t it?

Plain facts may be informative, but they are boring. Just stating the basics will immediately turn people off your writing. Creating a descriptive story will ensure more people read the essay than if you simply state the facts and go no further.

Get creative, pull those memories up and include details to make the story more real to your reader. Recall how you felt, how things smelled or tasted and what you were thinking during the events you’re recounting.

Present Your Point

At the climax of the story, your point will be made clear. There's no reason to state it flatly, but it should be obvious to the reader that something important happened and they should be able to draw their own conclusions at this point. When you look at a narrative essay example, you'll see that this climax is near the end of the essay and indicates a change of heart, a lesson learned or something similar.

The climax is the part of the story that people will remember most. It’s a sticking point, something that will catch in their mind and stay there, especially if well done. You can ensure that this is something memorable by adding a little twist or including details that will help the reader understand the importance of the moment.

Reflect on the Importance of the Story

Finally, you’ll wrap the essay up and finish it with a flourish. The conclusion or the final paragraph of the narrative essay is where you leave your reader with a brief summary.

The conclusion of the essay will review the important parts of the story and is the ideal place to look a little closer at the impact of the event you just shared. This is where you can really hammer home the point that you wanted to make, without being overly obvious.

Ideally, the final paragraph of your essay will stick with the reader for a long time. Don’t just recap, give them something to think about. This is the parting gift for your reader, something that they can think on for days or weeks to come.

Finally, you will need to edit and revise the narrative essay. This part is just as important as the actual writing, as you need to make sure that there are no discrepancies or errors to pull the reader out of the story. It can be helpful to put the essay aside for a few days so you can read it again with fresh eyes. Likewise, you may want to ask someone else to read it critically and mark any mistakes they find.

Look for spelling and grammar mistakes, of course, but you should also change up the writing if needed. A sentence that could be made better or clearer should be adjusted. The idea is to give your reader the best possible experience so they’ll want to share your narrative essay.

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